Worst Water Weeds #1: Hydrilla

17 Feb,2017 ,  By G. Sherman H. Morrison
Hydrilla

The Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health lists a total of 79 different invasive and exotic aquatic plants that can be found in various parts of the United States. Some are wreaking more havoc than others, but one of the worst of all is hydrilla. It has invaded across much of the southern United States, and is beginning to make its way northward. Below are the basics of this invasive exotic water weed that the USDA Forest Service calls “…one of the most troublesome aquatic plants in the United States.” Scientific Name: Hydrilla verticillata. Origins: This is unclear, but

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Worst Water Weeds #2: Eurasian Watermilfoil

10 Mar,2017 ,  By G. Sherman H. Morrison
Eurasian Watermilfoil

Commonly called Eurasian Watermilfoil or Spiked Watermilfoil, this invasive exotic water weed is becoming as widespread and as troublesome as Hydrilla. It’s on the list of 79 different invasive and exotic aquatic plants maintained by the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Although its feathery appearance is attractive, the Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force, a joint effort of the US Fish & Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, calls it “a highly invasive and aggressive species.” Scientific Name: Myriophyllum spicatum. Origins: The first recorded instances of Eurasian Watermilfoil date back to the 1940s, but it’s

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Worst Water Weeds #3: Duckweed

25 Apr,2017 ,  By G. Sherman H. Morrison
Duckweed

Duckweed makes our list of worst water weeds because it can be a huge nuisance to ponds and other still water bodies. There are many different species of this flowering floating aquatic plant, most of which are native, but at least one of which is exotic. What they all have in common, however, is that with the right conditions, they can be come incredibly invasive and wreak havoc on other native species. And yes, it also makes the list of 79 different invasive and exotic aquatic plants maintained by the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. While ducks do

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